Saturday, December 17, 2005

Senate Rejects Extension of Patriot Act

WASHINGTON - The Senate on Friday rejected attempts to reauthorize several provisions of the USA Patriot Act as infringing too much on Americans' privacy and liberty, dealing a huge defeat to the Bush administration and Republican leaders.



In a crucial vote early Friday, the bill's Senate supporters were not able to get the 60 votes needed to overcome a threatened filibuster by Sens. Russ Feingold, D-Wis., and Larry Craig, R-Idaho, and their allies. The final vote was 52-47.

President Bush, Attorney General Alberto Gonzales and Republicans congressional leaders had lobbied fiercely to make most of the expiring Patriot Act provisions permanent, and add new safeguards and expiration dates to the two most controversial parts: roving wiretaps and secret warrants for books, records and other items from businesses, hospitals and organizations such as libraries.

Feingold, Craig and other critics said that wasn't enough, and have called for the law to be extended in its present form so they can continue to try and add more civil liberties safeguards. But Bush, Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist and House Speaker Dennis Hastert have said they won't accept a short-term extension of the law.

If a compromise is not reached, the 16 Patriot Act provisions expire on Dec. 31.

3 Comments:

Anonymous CB said...

I never understood how the american people could allow their government to impose this "act" on their rights and freedoms. I know they were scared, and I suppose fear is the mind killer, but still...

December 18, 2005 2:21 am  
Blogger _H_ said...

Your right fear is a dangerous thing . I often wonder how diferent the world world be if any other person would have been president on sept 11th .

without making too much of a connection it is easy to see how the events of 9/11 was used in a similar way to how the burning of the Reisteig was used in nazi germany to drag the people into a world of fear and control ,

lets not forget the words of Herman Goering at the Nuremberg trials

"Of course the people don't want war. But after all, it's the leaders of the country who determine the policy, and it's always a simple matter to drag the people along whether it's a democracy, a fascist dictatorship, or a parliament, or a communist dictatorship. Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism, and exposing the country to greater danger."

December 18, 2005 2:50 am  
Blogger DJEB said...

"I never understood how the american people could allow their government to impose this "act" on their rights and freedoms. I know they were scared, and I suppose fear is the mind killer, but still..."

They are a remarkably fearful people, CB.

December 18, 2005 4:37 am  

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